Written on March 7, 2014 by Administrador de IE Blogs in Film

herSpike Jonze’s “Her” plays like a kind of miracle the first time around. Watching its opening shots of Joaquin Phoenix making an unabashed declaration of eternal love to an unseen soul mate is immediately disarming. The actor is so unaffected, so sincere, so drained of the tortured eccentricity that’s a hallmark of most of the roles that he plays. It’s like falling into a plush comforting embrace. Then one understands that the declaration isn’t his, but something he, or rather, his character, Theodore, does for his job.

As the movie continues, and the viewer learns more of what an ordinary guy Theodore is—he checks his e-mail on the ride home from work, just like pretty much all of us these days—director Jonze, who also wrote the movie’s script, constructs a beguiling cinematic world that also starts to embrace the viewer. The way Theodore’s smart phone and its earpiece work is different from ours, and soon it becomes clear that “Her” is something of a science-fiction film, set in the not-too-distant but distinctly fantastic future. A big part of the movie’s charm is just how thoroughly Jonze has imagined and constructed this future Los Angeles, from its smoggy skies to its glittering skyscrapers to its efficient mass transit system and much more. (There has already been, and there will no doubt be more, think pieces about how Caucasian this future L.A. is. There will likely be few think pieces about how the fashion for high-waisted pants in this future makes life unpleasant for the obese.)

The futuristic premise sets the stage for an unusual love story: one in which Theo, still highly damaged and sensitive over the breakup of his marriage (“I miss you,” a friend tells him in a voice mail message; “Not the sad, mopey you. The old, fun you”), falls in love with the artificially intelligent operating system of his computer. The movie shows this product advertised and, presumably, bought in remarkable quantity, but focuses on Theo’s interaction with his OS, which he gives a female voice. The female voice (portrayed beautifully by Scarlett Johansson) gives herself the name “Samantha” and soon Samantha is reorganizing Theo’s files, making him laugh, and developing something like a human consciousness.

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