20
Jan

Last Wednesday, the students from the Segovia Campus had the opportunity of enjoying the third event planned within the Cycle of Conferences, focusing this year on India, and organised by the IE Humanities Center. This session, entitled “India: Visions from Within” revolved around the self-perceptions of Indians about their country and traditional culture, and the future challenges for Indian society. We were honoured with the presence of Veena Venugopal, writer, journalist and editor of Blink and the Hindu Business Line, and of Prof. Eugenio Luján, Dean of Philology of the Universidad Complutense (Madrid) and Associate Professor of Humanities at IE Business School, and one the most renowned Spanish specialists in India’s religion and culture. Their conversation was moderated by Susana Torres, Professor of Humanities at IE University.

The conversation started by highlighting the vast diversity of languages, ethnic origins and religions of the peoples of India and how each of these factors serves as a personal and social identifier of Indians today. Veena Venugopal stressed the idea that conflict and riots are often used as a political weapon, particularly before elections, in order to gain votes, as well as the high degree of tolerance that is common in Indian society. We then talked about the cast system, and Eugenio Luján explained its origins, deeply linked to religious beliefs, going back to almost 3,000 years, and how is it related to social and economic development in India. It was agreed that the level of awareness of their own cast is more powerfully felt by Indians of lower classes and Ms. Venugopal explained the pros and cons of current policies of cast quotas and the social response to them.

One of the issues that also emerged in the talk was the situation of women in Indian society today, the tension between their traditional roles and their place in current society. There was time to discuss how they are portrayed in modern cinema and television, what the reaction of Indian society, and of women in particular, has been to attacks on women that have made international headlines recently, and how Indian women try to find their own place in modern Indian society and politics.

The floor was then opened to students, who asked about several social and political issues in modern India and gave their own first-hand impressions of some of the questions discussed.

16
Jan
9
Jan

Enhancing the Relevance and Impact of Business Research

Written on January 9, 2017 by Santiago Iñiguez in Education

By Santiago Iñiguez de Onzoño, President of IE University.

In Plato’s Dialogues (5th Century BC) we see that the participants in the philosophical debates with Socrates are the politicians and businesspeople of the day. The Agora(i.e., in ancient Greece, the place for doing business) and the Academe (the place for education) were closely linked, not just because of their physical proximity, but because the same people were active in both spheres.

I was inspired to consider the idea of uniting Agora and Academe after reading Point to Point Navigation, the second instalment of Gore Vidal’s memoirs — as prescient and witty as its preceding volume. In line with his innate irreverence, one of the favorite targets of Vidal’s essays and articles is, again and again, the deeply entrenched prejudices held by some academics, as illustrated in this passage from the opening chapter:

Contrary to what many believe, literary fame has nothing to do with excellence or true glory or even with a writer’s position in the syllabus of a university’s English Department, itself as remote to the Agora as Academe’s shadowy walk. For any artist, fame is the extent to which the Agora finds interesting his latest work. If what he has written is known only to a few of other practitioners, or to enthusiasts … then the artist is not only not famous, he is irrelevant to his time, the only time he has.

It is time to bring the Agora and the Academe closer and business schools can play a leading role in making this happen.

Some business school managers – most, I hope — consider that an important part of their institution’s mission is to bridge the business world and academia. Some others – few, I believe — emphasize that business schools are academic institutions and they should seek their own identity, separate from the business world.  Read more…

21
Dec

Happy Holidays! – Winter Break 2016/17

Written on December 21, 2016 by Administrador de IE Blogs in IE University

2
Dec

The subtle voice of intelligence

Written on December 2, 2016 by Susana Torres Prieto in Conference, IE University

11428Dileep Padgaonkar, former editor of The Times of India, passed away in Pune last Friday November 25th.

Dileep was our guest in Segovia during the last Hay Festival and during his conversation he could expose his particular view of India’s current challenges in view of the changes undergone by the country in recent decades. For someone who has been on the forefront of journalism for more than four decades, it might seem something easy to do. But Dileep not only had a special talent to see the dots between questions that most of us missed, and formulated the most poignant questions, he also had the special charm of someone who is equally comfortable, and competent, discussing the future of the Congress Party in India and the nature of love and sexual drive in both Western and Eastern literary traditions.

His exquisite education, by Jesuits, as he liked to point out, his many years spent abroad and his witnessing the second half of the last century, with its many lights and shadows, gave him a rare capacity for understanding the many depths of the human soul. He was a delight to listen to, he was a breadth of fresh air mixed with calmed wisdom, he was the West and the East in one (a clear proof that intelligence does not know any geographical borders). And he will be much missed.

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